Limbo

Probably spoilers in here.  Just a warning.

People are always asking me what I think of certain indie games that existed before I started Indie Gamer Chick.  The two most commonly asked about titles are Fez and Limbo.  I couldn’t finish Fez because of my epilepsy, so Limbo is the only one I’m really qualified to speak of.  But seriously, it’s like a daily thing.  “What did you think of Limbo?”  As if Limbo is the be-all, end-all of console-based indies.

I liked Limbo.  I really did.  I also feel the game is fairly overrated.  When you strip out of the visuals and bleakness, it’s just a good, but not great, platformer.  A trend I’ve noticed is that a lot of people only played through the early part of the game.  When you first enter Limbo, you can be left shell-shocked by the dark tone, spooky visuals, and the fact that one of the first things that happens is an awesome, intense encounter with a giant spider.  It perhaps gives the false impression that all those emotions will retain their impact through-out the game.  They don’t.  At least for me, I found myself desensitized to the whole concept not even half-way in.  Once Limbo started focusing more on twitchy-platforming instead of physics-based puzzles, I started finding myself almost bored.  It never fully becomes a chore, but once it starts becoming a platforming cliché, it does sort of burn out.

I filled in the blanks by pretending that the game starred Schroeder from The Peanuts.  Here he is, learning of Charlie Brown's final fate.

I filled in the blanks by pretending that the game starred Schroeder from The Peanuts. Here he is, learning of Charlie Brown’s final fate.

Also, it was hard to get worked up about the setting when the game was using the all-deflecting “it’s an art game” shield, which pretty much guaranteed an ending “left open to interpretation.”  Never been a fan of that.  Especially when the game was abstract to begin with.  So I guess the idea is the kid, or kids, are dead.  How they died or when or where or why is never explained.  Theories range from a car wreck to falling out of the tree house to being murdered.  I guess from a marketing point of view, it works, because at least people are talking about the game.  But I found the ending unsatisfying, because it offered no closure at all.  When you invest hours into a game hoping to get some kind of explanation for all the fucked up happenings and the payoff is more questions, it almost feels like the director himself didn’t really know where to go with it.  I’ll call this the “Tim Burton’s Planet of the Apes Effect.”

Yea, sometimes the questions are more fun than the answers, but in the case of Limbo, you’re playing characters that have no characterization at all.  The boy has no back story, no dialog, no personality, no facial expressions, or anything else going for him.  The girl is no different.  You’re forced to fill in the blanks yourself, but most of the symbolism is in the background and can be easily missed on account of you playing the game.  Because the actual gameplay starts to dull towards the end, Limbo really doesn’t lend itself well to replaying to look for the clues that you missed.

Limbo’s ending. I apologize for comparing it to Burton’s Planet of the Apes. That’s a low-blow.

I don’t mean to be too negative here.  Sometimes Limbo is brilliantly designed from a gameplay perspective.  The bits with the spider early on are one of my all-time gaming highlights.  Unfortunately, Limbo pretty much shot its wad in the first twenty minutes.  Nothing that followed the sequence where you’re hopping in the spider’s cocoon came remotely close to the thrills and chills that section offered.  All that’s left is solid physics-based platforming that I almost wish was in a more cheerful setting, because too much dark shit can get exhausting.  But hey, dark is in right now.  Any product that aims to be joyful is setting itself up for failure.  If an indie game isn’t so bleak that you want to bury your face in your hands and cry, the developer must be mentally ill.  Or possibly not mentally ill enough.

boxartlgLimbo was developed by Playdead

IGC_Approved1200 Microsoft Points honest to God can’t believe they just ported this thing to iOS.  There is no fucking way this can be played well with fake virtual buttons in the making of this review.

Limbo is Chick Approved

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About Indie Gamer Chick
The most read Xbox Live Indie Game critic in the world.

5 Responses to Limbo

  1. xionix55 says:

    I did not even read the review, but THANK YOU for those red letters at the begining. After a little sad story called Eternal Darkness (a game that I read so much, that in the end I did not get it, because I knew that the experince that one time might have been, was already gone) spoilers and me dont get along. I want to try the game in the future, so, as fellow latin, I thank you.

  2. Mike says:

    As one who is a fan of the “art game”, this review is spot on. Limbo is a platformer with a visual hook that doesn’t last long. I was hoping to learn at the end I killed all the children and this was my hell. Or that I was yet another victim of a child killing mass murder. Something. Anything. Not saying every game has to tie it all up in a neat bow but Limbo feels like some one just said “hey what if we don’t bother and call it art?”

  3. Bitserum says:

    I wanted to like Limbo. I love those artsy-fartsy games that leave themselves open to player interpretation, I really do. But Limbo… I couldn’t force myself to play the other half. I was bored, the story was non-existent. Pretty much like you said, it offered nothing (or not enough) building blocks to build some enticing interpretation out of it.

    I appreciate the game’s aesthetic value, but that’s about it.

    It did cure my hiccups twice though.

  4. Pingback: Indie Links Round-Up: Count On It | The Indie Game Magazine - Indie Game Reviews, Previews, News & Downloads

  5. Pingback: That Belated Limbo Review | Albinofruit.com

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