The Indie Gamer Chick Mailbag: April 21, 2014

I typically get a lot of questions on Twitter about random game stuff. Thoughts on the indie scene, on mainstream gaming, etc. I’m quickly learning that Twitter is a lousy place to answer any questions. It’s tough to explain complex opinions in 140 characters or less. So I figured I would start a mailbag feature. I announce it, and suddenly I go from getting questions every few minutes to getting no questions at all. Grumble. Well, a few guys did ask some stuff, so I’ll give the whole mailbag thing a try.

@LostScarf asks

Do you think Indie games would be more successful if they took the time to add Online Co-op, or it wouldn’t matter?

It depends on the game. Some titles really could have benefited from a more robust online experience. But there are roadblocks if you attempt it. On XBLIG, getting online working was overly difficult. Developers did not have access to Xbox Live when making games that would utilize Xbox Live. But even when you’re not developing for a system that actively seems to be trolling its own developers, optimizing an online co-op experience is extremely difficult. Especially if you give a shit about the emotional and psychological experience of your game. There’s almost no way to measure how effective your work is in those areas, especially if your concept involves two strangers working together. It’s a leap of faith.

Does it make a difference in a game’s sales? I’m not totally convinced. My favorite aspect of Terraria was playing it with Brian on two PS3s and two TVs. We also very much enjoyed sharing some of our extra plunder with my fans on Twitter. Hell, I met my best friend Bob that way. But, I was surprised to learn that most of the Terraria fans that follow me on Twitter never played it co-op at all. That’s not that uncommon with many indies that have an optional co-op mode. So I guess, unless a game is designed specifically with online co-op in mind, it won’t make a big enough difference that anyone should lose sleep over it.

@iilusionofchaos asks

If you could change one thing about your favorite game, what would it be?

My favorite game ever is WarioWare Inc.: Mega Microgame$ for Game Boy Advance. It just got re-released on Wii U’s Virtual Console. Easy answer here: I wish it had online leaderboards.

@TerrorSkwirl asks

Who/what do you think is the most well written character in recent memory?

Clem from Walking Dead. Her actions, speaking style, reactions to situations, and emotional state all feel like a real person. The strange thing is, there are a lot of secondary characters in the Walking Dead games that feel like lazy stereotypes, if not outright parodies. There’s just enough of those type of characters that you wouldn’t expect to see such an incredibly authentic character emerge. Clem is a real person in a real zombie apocalypse.

I’ll give a close second to Balloon from Doki-Doki Universe. Her undying love for protagonist QT3 was so moving and, again, authentic. Doki Doki was, as of yet, the only game I streamed my entire play-session on Twitch. I had some tough guys admit they were tearful as the ending between QT3 and Balloon played out. No violence. No cursing. No high-stakes. Just love and admiration between two friends, and it was more real than many of cinemas highest-paid actors are capable of delivering.

@Scott_A_Bennett asks

if you could only change one thing about the indie scene what would it be?

The perception that the community is too exclusive for newcomers to jump in. I think people expect the scene to be populated by anti-social, standoffish artsy types. They exist, but they’re very much the minority. The indie scene at large is so very welcoming and encouraging to newcomers. Hell, you don’t even have to be an active developer. I’ve never made a game, never will, and I have a site that, more often than not, doesn’t speak highly of the games I play. If the general perception of the indie scene were true, I would have been run out of town a week after I arrived. Instead, I’ve found an endless stream of new friends and fantastic relationships. And I’m certainly not alone in this type of experience with indies. That is the story that we need to make sure gets told. Unlike a lot of other things I wish would change, this one is very easily doable.

@Rabite890 asks

do you find the reports about the number of steam games that go unplayed/uninstalled to be as bad as some do?

Whenever I go grocery shopping, if I’m hungry when I go, you can bet the shopping cart is going to be overflowing full of all kinds of stuff I would normally not pick up. Then it will linger in our kitchen cabinets until it goes past the  expiration date.

That’s probably what happens with Steam, or hell, any platform when a sale hits. I have 217 PSN games on my PlayStation 3 and there’s at least 40 I’ve never booted up. I either got them with PlayStation Plus, or I bought them when they were on sale and just never got around to playing them. I do it on my Vita too, then the shitty, too small memory card fills up and I have to start deleting stuff. I can always redownload it any time, of course, but I probably won’t. It’s impulsive behavior from people with too much disposable income, but by no means indicative of any problem on the indie scene.

And finally, @Bonedwarf asks

I’ll give you a tough one. You can give 12 words of advice to all aspiring indie devs. What are they?

Nothing will go exactly as you envision, so be patient and humble.

(points at the screen and counts the words silently)

Damn, I’m good.

Well, I had fun doing this. If you guys had fun reading it, just send me a tweet with the hashtag #IGCMailbag and we’ll do it again. It will help keep the content on this site going when I’m post seizure and unable to get my game on.

Like my new logo? The gentleman who designed it, Kenneth Seward Jr., is for hire! Visit his site and check him out on Twitter. Reasonable rates, awesome work!

Still here? Cool. I have a new blog that will contain my non-gaming related ravings.

 

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Doki Doki Universe

Doki Doki Universe comes from famed developer Greg Johnson.  Owner of the most generic name in the universe that doesn’t contain “John” or “Smith” in it.  I suppose that’s why his most famous title, ToeJam & Earl, is so outlandish.  Somebody is overcompensating.  But really, you can see the influence to a degree, along with the situational comedy of other titles he contributed to, such as Spore or the Sims 2.  And, by situational comedy, I mean such events as adolescent, anamorphic sushi volunteering to be eaten alive by a nauseated sumo wrestler, or having to get a man turned into a toilet seat turned back human in time for his wedding.  All this is presided over by a robot named QT3, who was abandoned by his family and set to be scrapped because he lacks humanity.  However, if he can learn humanity from an alien named Jeff, he’ll be spared from the junkyard.  Oh, and if you so desire, he can travel through space while ridding a giant mound of poo.

Eat Me

I typically only say this to haters.

Okay, so Doki Doki might pile on the “absurdity for the sake of absurdity” brand of humor a little too thick, but actually, it all is really quite sweet.  Gameplay consists of choosing a planet to land on.  Each planet has some human-condition theme to it.  It might be jealousy.  It might be bullying.  I thought this was going to be obnoxiously heavy-handed.  Instead, the over-the-top dialog and comical stupidity of it makes the delivery of the morality digestible.  Basically, you’ll walk around the planet collecting “hidden” presents (that are often in plain sight) and conjuring up art-assets to solve the problems for each world’s residents.  Every planet has a set number of tasks to complete.  Once you finish those, you can go around trying to please or anger the population to earn more presents, which will either be experience points, new art assets to summon, or new decorations for your home planet.  It’s sort of Scribblenauts, without the typing, done as a series of fetch-quests.  But, unlike Scribblenauts, I found the whole thing really rewarding.

Doki Doki Universe plays out like a simplified personality tester.  It’s not subtle about this at all.  Sometimes, when making a decision, the game will declare in bold letters some attribute you have, based on your choice.  If I told a rock that his name is Rock because he’s a rock, the game declared that I was a realist.  What else are you going to name a Rock?  Dwayne?  Also, between planets, there are multiple little moons that feature a handful of questions that further test your personality.  I tried to answer them as honestly as I could.  After finishing each quiz (which are between 3 to 5 questions in length), the game will give you an assessment of your personality, and explanations for how they came to that conclusion.  You can then return to your home planet to get a more thorough explanation that sums up all the questions you’ve answered.  The game determined the following things about me, which I crossed-checked with friends and family to see how accurate they felt it was.

Sorry, no follow-up questions allowed.  Like I wasn't able to find out if the Grim Reaper toy had actual governance over the mortality of other toys or just make-believe powers.  So I chose the RC Car.

Sorry, no follow-up questions allowed. Like I wasn’t able to find out if the Grim Reaper toy had actual governance over the mortality of other toys or just make-believe powers. So I chose the RC Car.

  • I enjoy wild and silly humor and visual comedy.  100% agreement.
  • I am a creator of art (not remotely accurate), and seek to enrich the world.  The creator of art thing was debated upon.  Is the stuff I write at Indie Gamer Chick a form of art?  If the answer is no, the art thing is completely inaccurate.  Everyone felt the enrich the world part was fair though.
  • I like stories set in the distant past or future.  Change is exciting.  Another direct hit.
  • In stories, I look for strong plot over emotion.  We all agree, that’s not remotely accurate.
  • I search for beauty in the world around me.   100% agreement.
  • I have a good memory and I’m good at finishing things.  My memory is great when it’s not messed up by having seizures.  The finishing things part?  I have like twenty reviews and editorials I’ve started but never finished here.  I think that means “wrong.”
  • It also noted at various times that I’m motivated by money (check), have an excellent sense of rhythm (wrong), stand up for others (check) but never in a mean way (some XBLIG developers might disagree with that).
  • In total, we figured it was about 50% accurate.  Which at least beats my level of accuracy when playing Remote Viewer.

    In total, we figured it was about 50% accurate. Which at least beats my level of accuracy when playing Remote Viewer.

So basically horoscope-accurate.  In fact, I’m sure the blind horoscope test will apply to pretty much anyone playing Doki Doki Universe.  The blind horoscope test is where a room full of people are given the same horoscope, but told each person is getting a unique one based on their birthday.  Typically, between 75% to 90% of the room will say the horoscope is “mostly” accurate in describing them.  So while I was playing Doki Doki Universe, as my boyfriend watched, he often said “wow, scary accurate” to many things.  When something is a hit, the reaction it generates is typically pleasure and awe, which causes your average person to not dwell upon the stuff that is grossly inaccurate.  No, I’m not particularly artistic, nor am I rhythmic.  But then again, I’m not sure if I expected different from a game that decided to test my personality by asking if I would wear an octopus as a hat.  Which, for the record,  I wouldn’t.  A scarf?  Maybe.  But not a hat.

Beyond the personality crapola, my biggest complaint is that occasionally you’ll pick an item to conjure up for a local, but it will spit out an entirely different item and call it a “BACKFIRE!!”  You can count on this happening at least once, maybe as much as four times, on a single planet.  It doesn’t really impede progress, since you can’t game over, so it just because a brief, annoying waste of time that could quickly be overcome.  It serves absolutely no point in the game (unless you believe my buddy Bob, who pointed out that sometimes you don’t always get what you want in life.  Yea, but this isn’t life.  It’s a fucking video game.  Give me what I want).  I also never really came remotely close to running out of the energy (called Dust-Bunnies) that you use to create the objects.  In order to earn the trophy for using them all, I had to use the otherwise useless “find the hidden treasures” power about fifty times in a row.  Doki Doki Universe is not a game you should approach if you’re looking for a challenge.  I had Christmas presents that gave me a tougher time trying to open than Doki Doki gave me trying to get every trophy.

This is one of the DLC Levels. You can get all six extra planets for $3.98.  If you're into the personality tests, you can get all 24 extra of those for $2.98. The $24.99 "Limited Edition" pack is a total waste of money, with many of the features unrelated to actual gameplay.  Skip it, buy the extras separate.

This is one of the DLC Levels. You can get all six extra planets for $3.98. If you’re into the personality tests, you can get all 24 extra of those for $2.98. The $24.99 “Limited Edition” pack is a total waste of money, with many of the features unrelated to actual gameplay. Skip it, buy the extras separate.

But it was really fun.  What I found most satisfying was the relationship between QT3 and a small red balloon on the home planet, which is actually named Balloon.  It was the most genuine, heart-string-pulling gaming relationship I’ve seen in quite a while.  Very moving, very loving, and it reduced more than one or two tough guys into blubbering crybabies.  I was way more interested in what was going on between them than I was with QT3 and his girlfriend that shows up at the end.  That whole bit reminded me of Snoopy Come Home, where everything revolved around Snoopy’s reunion with his previous owner, Lila, but when they finally met up it was still sweet, but kind of disappointing.  Really, my biggest regret with Doki Doki Universe is that Balloon didn’t accompany QT3 on all his adventures.  Instead, you’re supposed to catch up between planets.  I didn’t mind though.  I loved the innocence of their dynamic.  For a game with numerous shit jokes, it kept things between them pure, sort of like Christopher Robin and Winnie the Pooh, only without the mental illness overtones.  So I really recommend Doki Doki Universe.  It’s the first really good game available on PSN for PlayStation 4.  Don’t worry, PS3 and Vita owners can play it as well.  No having to sell a kidney on the black market to be able to play this one.

Doki Doki logoDoki Doki Universe was developed by HumanNature Studios

Seal of Approval Large$14.99 (plus $6.96 worth of DLC) also found out that this doesn’t make the most exciting game for live streaming in the making of this review.

Doki Doki Universe is Chick-Approved and Ranked (pretty dang high) on the Indie Gamer Chick Leaderboard.

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